How to fix Windows 10 registry tweak to view builds, as it’ll block future updates

Windows 10 cyan logo

Recently a post showed up on the internet detailing how a changing a Windows 10 registry key allows to see unreleased versions of the operating system and choose how fast users can download those bits. As it turns out there is nothing good that will come out of it.

A new Tweet from Microsoft’s Gabriel Aul, in charge of the Windows Insider Program, he points out that performing the registry tweak in Windows 10 Technical Preview will actually prevent the system to receive any future builds. And you’ll probably be getting the error code 0x80246017 when attempting to download new Preview build.

Preview builds view registry tweak

As such, if you changed the registry in Windows 10 to see if you can access to early builds, you’ll have to follow a number of steps to get your system in white list to receive upcoming updates.

How to remove registry tweak to view builds on Windows 10

Open the Command Prompt as an Administrator and perform the following commands:

reg add "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\Applicability" /v "BranchName" /d "fbl_release" /t REG_SZ /f
reg add "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\Applicability" /v "ThresholdRiskLevel" /d "low" /t REG_SZ /f
reg delete "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\Applicability" /v "ThresholdInternal" /f
reg delete "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\Applicability" /v "ThresholdOptedIn" /f

This is how the registry should look like to continue receiving updates: 

Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\Applicability
    BranchName = fbl_release
    ThresholdRiskLevel = low
    ThresholdInternal = 
    ThresholdOptedIn =

It’s worth noting that changing registry keys in Windows is dangerous as such proceed with caution and backup as necessary.

Microsoft is hard at work building Windows 10 and the operating system is scheduled to release in mid-2015, and while we don’t know when we’ll see a new build for testing, we know it’s in the near future.

Source Twitter, Microsoft Answers

About the author

Mauro Huculak is a Windows expert and the Editor-in-Chief who started Pureinfotech in 2010 as an independent online publication. He is also been a Windows Central contributor for nearly a decade. Mauro has over 12 years of experience writing comprehensive guides and creating professional videos about Windows, software, and related technologies, including Android and Linux. Before becoming a technology writer, he was an IT administrator for seven years. In total, Mauro has over 20 years of combined experience in technology. Throughout his career, he achieved different professional certifications from Microsoft (MSCA), Cisco (CCNP), VMware (VCP), and CompTIA (A+ and Network+), and he has been recognized as a Microsoft MVP for many years. You can follow him on X (Twitter), YouTube, LinkedIn and About.me.