Microsoft sees free Windows RT and Windows Phone as a way to compete with Android

Windows RT and Window Phone devices

Microsoft is seriously thinking on completely eliminating licensing fees for Windows RT and Windows Phone operating systems for companies building smartphones and tablets. Of course the last word hasn’t been said yet, but this may be one of the steps that Microsoft will have to take to further get into the mobile market.

Currently the software giant is working on the next version of Windows, codenamed “Threshold”, which apparently will include the ability to use Windows 8.1 apps in the desktop, the company is also planning to bring back the Start menu to provide an easier way for users with keyboard and mouse to navigate the operating system, among other changes which are yet to be revealed. According to new report from The Verge, Microsoft will offer Windows Phone and Windows RT free of charge with the Threshold wave of updates.

Microsoft has a long-term plan, if the company ends up eliminating the licensing fees for Windows Phone and Windows RT software, money will still coming in but from Microsoft’s apps and services, such as Bing search, SkyDrive, Office, Skype, and others.

The goal is clear here, Microsoft offering Windows for free to device makers will put the company on demand, not only on devices, but it will also grab the developers attention, and it’ll put Windows on an equal field to compete with Android, which currently has a big share of the mobile market.

Early reports suggested that Microsoft has been trying to convince HTC to install the Windows Phone OS on Android devices by cutting prices, however there was never a solid answer of HTC agreeing to the terms.

No doubt that providing Windows RT and Windows Phone software for free will help Microsoft to expand Windows into the mobile market and in the process the company may just take a portion of revenue from Google, but more importantly consumers will have more choices at a lower cost — and this is one of the reasons why I love competition.

Source The Verge