Windows 10 version 1511 gets KB3135173 cumulative update

Microsoft releases update KB3135173 for the desktop version of Windows 10 fixing a number of issues.

Windows 10 activated on a laptop

Today is February 2016 Patch Tuesday, and alongside with the brand new Windows 10 Update History site, Microsoft is announcing the rollout of new cumulative update for Windows 10 version 1511.

The update is described as KB3135173, it brings the operating system to build 10586.104, and it addresses a number of issues regarding authentication, Microsoft Edge, Windows Store apps, Groove Music playback, and more.

Here’s what’s new in KB3135173 for Windows 10

  • Fixed issues with authentication, update installation, and operating system installation.
  • Fixed issue with Microsoft Edge browser caching visited URLs while using InPrivate browsing.
  • Fixed issue that didn’t allow simultaneous install of apps from the Windows Store and updates from Windows Update.
  • Fixed issue that delayed the availability of songs added to the Groove Music app in Windows 10 Mobile.
  • Improved security in the Windows kernel.
  • Fixed security issues that could allow remote code execution when malware is run on a target system.
  • Fixed security issues in Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer 11 that could allow code from a malicious website to be installed and run on a device.
  • Fixed additional issues with the Windows UX, Windows 10 Mobile, Internet Explorer 11, Microsoft Edge, and taskbar.
  • Fixed additional security issues with .NET Framework, Windows Journal, Active Directory Federation Services, NPS Radius Server, kernel-mode drivers, and WebDAV.

As always, the February 9th update for Windows 10 is cumulative, and it includes all the previously installed updates. Therefore, only the new changes will download and install in your computer.

KB3135173 is available immediately through Windows Update for computers that aren’t part of the Insider program, and it’ll download and install automatically. However, you can always go to Settings > Update & security> Windows Update and manually force the download.

Source Windows 10 Update History, Microsoft 

About the author

Mauro Huculak is a Windows expert and the Editor-in-Chief who started Pureinfotech in 2010 as an independent online publication. He is also been a Windows Central contributor for nearly a decade. Mauro has over 12 years of experience writing comprehensive guides and creating professional videos about Windows, software, and related technologies, including Android and Linux. Before becoming a technology writer, he was an IT administrator for seven years. In total, Mauro has over 20 years of combined experience in technology. Throughout his career, he achieved different professional certifications from Microsoft (MSCA), Cisco (CCNP), VMware (VCP), and CompTIA (A+ and Network+), and he has been recognized as a Microsoft MVP for many years. You can follow him on X (Twitter), YouTube, LinkedIn and About.me.