Official name

Windows 10 ‘May 2020 Update’ could be the official name of the 20H1 development

Reference in latest preview suggests that Microsoft will use the month and year of the release date again to give Windows 10 version 2003 its official marketing name.

Windows 10 May 2020 Update official name (image source Tero Alhonen)

It’d seem like Microsoft is planning to name the next major release of Windows 10 the “May 2020 Update.” Although the software giant hasn’t officially revealed the marketing name of version 2003, the latest 19H1 preview build for servers include a reference of “Windows 10 May 2020 Update/Server 2003” when running the Get-VMHostSupportedVersion PowerShell command.

Looking back to previous names (such as May 2019 Update and October 2018 Update) that the company has been using, the new reference makes a lot of sense, and it appears that Microsoft will continue to follow the pattern when it comes to naming its feature updates.

If the name stays, we can only assume that the next feature update is likely to arrive sometime in May — toward the end of the month or during the first weeks of June.

The “Windows 10 May 2020 Update” is expected to include several new features and improvements, including tweaks to the Start menu and search and new tablet experience for touch-enabled devices. You’ll also see a new version of Cortana that will behave just like a regular app and will be available to all users.

In addition, Windows 10 will be improving many of the already available features. For example, with the May 2020 Update, the Reset this PC feature will include a new “Cloud Download” option, which allows you to download a fresh copy from the cloud to reinstall Windows 10, instead of using the image locally available on your device. Task Manager will now be capable of reporting temperature for your GPU. There will be a new version of the Windows Subsystem for Linux with various improvements, and a lot more.

You can check all the new features and changes for Windows 10 May 2020 Update in this guide.

Keep in mind that while the reference exists, it’s not official, which means that the name can always change at the last minute.

Do you think that Microsoft should continue using the month and year as part of the naming convention for new versions? Tell us in the comments.